Robert Weil 2017 Riesling Sekt Brut, Rheingau, Germany

Robert Weil 2017 Riesling Sekt Brut, Rheingau, Germany

Robert Weil

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Robert Weil 2017 Riesling Sekt Brut, Rheingau, Germany

Robert Weil 2017 Riesling Sekt Brut, Rheingau, Germany

Founded in 1875, Weingut Robert Weil is one of the Rheingau’s most highly regarded wine estates. It is located in Kiedrich, a village first documented in the year 950. Kiedrich Turmberg and Gräfenberg, the estate’s top vineyards, are among the finest sites in the Rheingau. The estate cultivates 90 hectares (222 acres) of vineyards, 100 percent planted with Riesling. Wilhelm Weil, the great-grandson of the estate’s founder, carries on the tradition of uncompromising, quality-oriented vineyard and cellar practices – a tradition that has been the hallmark of the winery for four generations.   
  • Winemaker: Wilhelm Weil
  • Variety: Riesling
  • Farming: Sustainable
  • Terroir / Soil: Deep and medium-deep stony, fragmented phyllite partially mixed with loess and loam. Made with fruit harvested from parcels neighboring famous Kiedrich Gräfenberg Grosse Lage vineyard. The soils are similar, but these sites are cooler than Gräfenberg, yielding less-ripe fruit with firm acidity that is ideal for sparkling wine. 
  • Vinification: The fruit is picked at Kabinett ripeness and produced using the classic "méthode champenoise" technique. Primary fermentation occurs in stainless steel, while secondary occurs in the bottle, left on its lees six months prior to disgorgement. 
  • Tasting Notes: Aromatically this wine is full of mixed citrus flavors, like the zest of lemons and limes, as well as tart tangerine. On the palate, the has refreshingly sharp acidity, with well-integrated flavors of nuttiness, brioche, and honey.

Bottle Club Notes, December 2020

Robert Weil   |  Riesling Sekt Brut  |  Rheingau, Germany  |  2017

Who doesn't love some bubbles? But when was the last time you had some Riesling Brut?? Now, before you jump to conclusions about drinking "sweet" sparkling wine, let's first warn you that the Germans can make some SERIOUSLY good, SERIOUSLY dry sparkling wine. And why shouldn't they? They consume more sparkling wine than any other country in the world! Also, they have some of the coldest grape growing climates on the planet, perfect for producing the high-acid grapes needed for traditional method sparkling wine. 

So now about the sweet part— this is the biggest misconception about Riesling, and we at DECANT are always here to debunk the myths for you. Riesling comes in many shapes and sizes. Yes, sometimes it is sweet & delicious, but very often it is also quite dry. And when made into sparkling wine, that dryness helps to create some of the most complex, minerally and layered sparkling wine on the market! 

Robert Weil is a relatively young house in the German winemaking landscape, having established itself in 1875. That might not seem so young, but the village that it's located in, Keidrich, in the heart of the Rheingau region, has records that first date back to 950! Today, Wilhelm Weil, the fourth generation of his family, oversees the farming and winemaking of the Robert Weil estate, and he is perhaps the most meticulous generation yet. Having taken over in 1987, Wilhelm made it his mission to return the Rheingau to world-class recognition, after having lost market share to the Mosel in the mid-century. 

Riesling is a highly dynamic grape which is so sensitive to microclimate and soils, so it's important to know where you're drinking from and who made it. This Sekt is made with fruit harvested from parcels neighboring the famous Kiedrich Gräfenberg Grosse Lage vineyard. The soils are similar, but these sites are cooler than Gräfenberg, yielding less-ripe fruit with firm acidity that is ideal for sparkling wine. The fruit is picked at Kabinett ripeness and produced using the classic "méthode champenoise" technique. The French law prohibits the Germans from calling it méthode champenoise so it is known in German as "Traditionelle Flaschengärung", which translates to "traditional bottle fermentation".

Wilhelm then mirrors the Champagne method of winemaking, fermenting the base wine in stainless steel, then aging on its lees for half a year before sending it to market. This young, fresh sparkler is thus bursting with bright, tart tropical fruits, and has a minerally edge that comes from the complex layers of metamorphic rock and mixed loam found in the steep, south-facing vineyards. This wine is lean but fierce, so pop this baby to pair with brunch of lox and bagels, fresh fruit and maybe some caviar!


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